Please select your home edition
Edition
Hella Marine - NZ - 728 - July

Bob Irwin headlines campaign to Fight For the Reef

by Jeni Bone on 16 Jun 2014
Bob defends the Reef .. ©
Bob Irwin, dad of the late and much-loved conservationist Steve Irwin, is urging Aussies to have their say about the Great Barrier Reef. Irwin, starring in a new series of TV ads running in the lead up to the UNESCO decision on the status of the Reef, states that the Reef is under threat from widespread, rapid and damaging set of industrial developments.

Imminent decisions from UNESCO’s World Heritage Committee have spurred a global response, as thousands around the world express their concern at the Australian Government’s failure to protect key environmental areas

In meetings to be held this week in Doha, the World Heritage Committee will decide the fate of two of Australia’s most precious and iconic environments – Tasmania’s ancient forests and the Great Barrier Reef.

The Queensland Government is fast-tracking the dredging and dumping of millions of tonnes of seabed and rock in the Reef’s waters, and a near-doubling of bulk carriers cutting through the Reef.

The federal government is considering approval of these developments, including the world’s biggest coal port at Abbot Point, 50 km from the Whitsunday Islands.

Fight for the Reef is a partnership between WWF-Australia and the Australian Marine Conservation Society (AMCS).

Fight for the Reef is working with the Australian community to protect the Reef, the $6 billion tourism industry and the 60,000 jobs it supports.

According to the stats on the WWF and Fight for the Reef sites, over 35 million tonnes of seabed will be dredged and dumped in marine habitat.

Dredging is undertaken in coastal Reef waters so that large coal, gas and other bulk carriers can access ports.
There are plans to expand ports and build new mega ports right along the coastline of the Great Barrier Reef.

Gladstone
The Port of Gladstone is the fifth largest coal export terminal in the world and the largest multi-commodity port in Queensland. There are two coal terminals at Gladstone port: Barney Point Coal Terminal and RG Tanna Coal Terminal. Between the two terminals there are 30 huge stockpiles of coal, with a capacity to export 78 million tonnes per annum.
The Queensland Government approved a new coal port terminal on Wiggins Island, in Gladstone Harbour, and construction is underway. This will require 6.3 million tonnes of seafloor to be dredged and dumped.

As part of the expansion of the Port of Gladstone, the development of three Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) processing plants and terminals on Curtis Island has pushed ahead. Plans for a fourth processing plant are underway. The Western Basin Project has been approved to deepen channels and provide berthing facilities for these LNG plants on Curtis Island and the western side of the Port of Gladstone. So far dredging for this project has totalled over 15 million tonnes, with 4.4 million tonnes dumped on the East Banks spoil ground in the World Heritage Area.

Fitzroy Delta and Balaclava Island
The Mitchell Group have plans to build a new coal terminal adjacent to Raglan Creek, a 13 km rail line through the estuary, and a 3 km conveyor belt through floodplains. The project will have the capacity to export 22 million tonnes of coal per annum.
The Fitzroy Delta is listed as a Nationally Important Wetland and the mouth of the Fitzroy River is the largest river catchment feeding the Great Barrier Reef. This is the second largest catchment in Australia, spanning 142,536 km².
There are proposals to build a 35 million tonnes per annum coal export facility at Balaclava Island in the Fitzroy Delta. This will require large amounts of dredging and result in an additional 60 bulk carriers in the area per year.
Ships will queue and anchor in a 2 km diameter zone off the coast of Peak Island – a highly protected conservation zone.

Dudgeon Point
North Queensland Bulk Ports Corporation Limited (NQBP) is proposing the construction of two coal port terminals at Dudgeon Point.
NQBP currently hold 1400 ha of land at Dudgeon Point. If the development is approved, the new coal terminals will have the capacity to export 180 million tonnes of coal per annum.
The proposed terminal will be large enough for super ships nearly 300 m long.

Abbot Point
Plans for Abbot Point will make it the world’s largest coal port – less than 50 km from the Whitsunday Islands.
Three new major terminal expansions are proposed for Abbot Point and these are referred to as Terminal 0 (T0), Terminal 2 (T2) and Terminal 3 (T3).
Green turtles are known to nest on beaches adjacent to the proposed new coal terminals at Abbot Point. The waters between Abbot Point and the Whitsunday Islands are a humpback whale gathering area.
The port sits alongside the Caley Valley wetlands, one of the largest intact wetland systems between Townsville and Bowen.

Wongai – Cape York
A new mining proposal, Cape York’s first coal mine, is proposed to extract 1.5 million tonnes per annum of coking coal from the Laura Basin (north of Galilee Basin). This project has recently been given special development status by the Queensland Government. Wongai is 150 km north of Cooktown and near Cape Melville National Park and Princess Charlotte Bay.

Townsville
The Port of Townsville is proposing a major expansion to provide more berths and landside facilities, deepen the existing channel and provide an outer harbour. This will result in another large dredging program that would see up to 6 million tonnes of dredge spoil dumped in the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area.


According to its opponents, dredging is a huge threat to the crystal clear waters of the Great Barrier Reef. Seabed and rock is dug up and then dumped in the Reef’s waters. Fine sediments are thrown up into the water and drift for kilometres, ruining water quality and covering seagrass beds and coral.

Just in the past five years, 52 million tonnes have been dredged in the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area, a recent Senate Inquiry was told.

Many of the areas dredged are feeding and breeding grounds for turtles, dugongs and other sensitive species.

Information on the Fight For the Reef site states: 'Massive amounts of dredging combined with large floods can cause major problems such as happened in Gladstone Harbour when dead dugongs, turtles and diseased fish were found in the summer of 2010-11. Fishing was banned for weeks and locals still do not eat the seafood caught there.'

There are huge plans for more dredging along the Reef. Sixty million tonnes of seafloor will be torn up to facilitate more coal and gas ships, as well as four major ports to process them - one of them one of the largest in the world. Much of this dredged material will be dumped in the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area.


The aim of the campaign is to raise awareness of the industrialisation occurring on the Great Barrier Reef’s coastline.

Specifically, the campaign seeks to:
• Immediately implement a moratorium on approving new development until a sustainable development plan for the Great Barrier Reef is completed.
• Permanently prohibit new port developments outside existing, long-established major ports.
• Ensure no dredge material is dumped within the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area.
• Improve existing industrial developments along the Reef’s coastline to ensure they operate at the world’s best practice standards.
• Limit ship numbers and anchorages and improve management to a level that ensures no impacts on the Reef.
• Invest considerable new funding in protecting and restoring key Reef ecosystems.




More at www.fightforthereef.org.au

Hall Spars - MastAbsolute MarineBavaria R40 660x82

Related Articles

Knowing Harken takes years and years (Pt.I)
You could imagine that being familiar with all that Harken produces and stands for is a lengthy process. You could imagine that being familiar with all that Harken produces and stands for is a lengthy process. So if you were going to be the person at the top in Australia, it would be best for you to have immersed yourself in sailing from an early age. When you grew up, being one of the technical service team would be more than a handy apprenticeship, as it were.
Posted on 19 Sep
Concern for Zika at Rio Olympics is now deadly serious
Alphabet soup is one description that has thus far not been used for either Guanabara Bay, Alphabet soup is one description that has thus far not been used for either Guanabara Bay, or the Rio Olympics. Many others have, and they were apt, but things have changed. So here now we have a situation where one man, Associate Professor Amir Attaran, who does have a more than decent string of letters after his name, is bringing nearly as many facts to bear as references at the article's end
Posted on 12 May
Interview with 'Mr Harken UK' - we speak to Andy Ash-Vie
We spoke to 'Mr Harken UK' Andy Ash-Vie about his early sailing and how he got into the marine industry. We spoke to 'Mr Harken UK' Andy Ash-Vie about his early sailing, how he got into the marine industry, how Harken UK have diversified and what sailing he has planned for 2016.
Posted on 10 May
Zhik - The brand born of a notion, not its history
here is probably every reason that ocean rhymes with notion. Zhik’s tagline is officially marketed as Made For Water There is probably every reason that ocean rhymes with notion. Zhik’s tagline has been officially marketed as Made For Water, and this is precisely what the company has done for the last eight years before the succinct and apt strapline came from out of R&D and into mainstream visibility.
Posted on 8 May
Children of the Internet, Rio and Hong Kong
I have four daughters, the youngest, who in her mid 20's is a true child of the Internet. I have four daughters, the youngest, who in her mid 20's is a true child of the Internet. The kind of conversations I have with her run along these lines.... In the olden days we did not have television until I left school and they had a thing called print magazines, that reported events between two weeks and four months after they happened. And her sceptical response... Hoh! Daddy, Hoh!
Posted on 14 Apr
Volvo Ocean Race appoints stadium racing pioneer as new CEO
Sail-World forecast the appointment of Mark Turner as Volvo Ocean Race CEO a month ago. We profiled Turner at that time. Sail-World forecast the appointment of Mark Turner as Volvo Ocean Race CEO a month ago. We profiled Turner at that time. Today his appointment has been confirmed.
Posted on 31 Mar
Laser creator Ian Bruce passes away (1933 - 2016)
Ian Bruce, driving force behind the Laser dinghy, sadly passed away at his daughter's home on Monday March 21 2016. Ian Bruce, driving force behind the Laser dinghy, sadly passed away at his daughter's home on Monday March 21 2016. His legacy to our sport, Canadian sailing and his beloved Royal St. Lawrence Yacht Club will be praised and honoured for years to come.
Posted on 24 Mar
Pantaenius Insurance - Close is more than deep enough for some.
As the sun finishes its day low behind the Nelson Bay marina, many a soul gathers above the rocks at the weigh station As the sun finishes its day low behind the Nelson Bay marina, many a soul gathers above the rocks at the weigh station. They could be local, from nearby or way farther afield and it is definitely not a sense of the macabre that draws them in. Rather, it is fascination and wonder, because for the sweeping majority, this is as close as they will ever get to Mother Nature’s marvels of the deep.
Posted on 14 Mar
If Zika more damaging then Ebola, should Rio 2016 become London 2016?
185 days before the Rio Olympics, Brazil is reeling under the affects of the Zika virus. 185 days before the Rio Olympics, Brazil is reeling under the affects of the Zika virus. World-wide this virus could cause millions of babies to be born with a life damaging disability, perhaps this could a much bigger threat to global health than the Ebola epidemic that killed more than 11,000 people in Africa.
Posted on 1 Feb
Rio 2016 Olympics - Do new health risks justify re-location?
Olympic athletes in Rio- A little-known virus is putting the Olympics-and possibly their futures-at risk. Ahead is the last vital months leading up to Rio 2016. Athletes have dedicated years of their lives to achieving excellence in the sport of sailing. Yet as these dedicated athletes fight hard to do well in a regatta that (country depending) helps determine Olympic berths, a little-known virus is putting the Olympics-and possibly their futures-at risk.
Posted on 30 Jan