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RS Sailing 2021 - LEADERBOARD
Environment

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    Areas the Rainier has surveyed for both mapping and corals as of May 1, 2022. Blue dots represent completed coral survey sites around the islands. Shaded colors around the islands indicate the range of water depth from the shallow (red) to deep (purple).
    © NOAA Office of Coastal Survey
    Divers swim in concentric circles collecting images of the reef that they will stitch together later to form a three-dimensional model.
    © NOAA Fisheries / K. Urquhart
    A curious anemonefish looks at a diver during a fish survey at Tinian Island
    © NOAA Fisheries / Matt Chauvin
    A scientist conducts a reef fish survey at Aguijan Island.
    © NOAA Fisheries / Mia Lamirand
    The ocean and climate change team prepare a suite of instruments to carefully lower to the seafloor to record environmental information.
    © NOAA Fisheries
    Fisherman offloading catch at dock.
    © NOAA Fisheries
    Dutch Harbor, Alaska.
    © NOAA Fisheries
    School of yellowfin tuna in the Atlantic Ocean.
    © iStock
    Dangerous fishing conditions 20-21 May
    © RFA of NSW
    savvy navvy goes beyond ECMWF weather forecasting with Meteomatics integration
    © savvy navvy
    USA volunteers representing Iron Workers Local 92 and United Association Local 91 along with professional anglers and Major League Fishing staff assembled 85 artificial fish habitats.
    © Union Sportsmen’s Alliance
    USA volunteers representing Iron Workers Local 92 and United Association Local 91 along with professional anglers and Major League Fishing staff assembled 85 artificial fish habitats.
    © Union Sportsmen’s Alliance
    Eighty-five MossBack artificial structures were installed at Duck River Reservoir in Cullman, Alabama, on May 11.
    © Union Sportsmen’s Alliance
    A guide to fishing in the Gulf of Mexico
    © Mustad Fishing
    A guide to fishing in the Gulf of Mexico
    © Mustad Fishing
    Barotrauma is a pressure-related injury that occurs when fish are reeled up from depth. Gases expand in the body cavity of fish displacing organs and leaving fish bloated and unable to return to depth.
    © Brenton Roberts / Florida Sportsman
    Descending devices are weighted devices that help fish recover from barotrauma by releasing them at depth.
    © Return 'Em Right
    Return 'Em Right provides support and resources to anglers committed to using best release practices and helping reef fish survive release.
    © Return 'Em Right
    A juvenile Hawaiian monk seal rests on the beach.
    © NOAA Fisheries (NMFS Permit #22677; PMNM Permit #2021-015)
    Solid circles indicate best estimate. Vertical lines span 95% confidence intervals. Estimates in MHI are only available beginning in 2009. Partners supplied enough data to estimate MHI abundance in 2020, but the number of seals was not estimated that year
    © NOAA Fisheries
    A mother and calf vaquita surface in the waters off San Felipe, Mexico. As recently as Fall 2021 vaquitas were seen with calves.
    © Paula Olson, 2008
    Atlantic cod
    © NOAA Fisheries
    Onboard the F/V Mary Elizabeth, Captain Phil Lynch (background) hauls in the fishing gear. Crew member Steve Kenney (foreground) holds up white hake.
    © NOAA Fisheries / Emma Fowler
    One of the Atlantic cod captured on the longline survey after being removed from the surrounding fishing gear.
    © NOAA Fisheries / Dave McElroy
    The Tenacious II, a commercial fishing boat that is used to conduct the Gulf of Maine bottom longline survey, tied up at a mooring.
    © Captain Eric Hesse
    Three white hake sorted into a basket before they are weighed and worked up by scientists.
    © NOAA Fisheries / Jack Wilson
    Cooperative Research Branch field biologist, Emma Fowler, holds one of the more impressively sized white hake during the Fall 2021 survey.
    © NOAA Fisheries / Giovanni Gianesin
    Hawaii longline fishermen use leaders to connect weighed branch lines and baited hooks. A new rule prohibits steel wire leaders in the Hawaii deep-set longline fishery. The rule aims to increase the survival of hooked oceanic whitetip sharks.
    © NOAA Fisheries
    Monofilament nylon leader connected to hook and weighted swivel.
    © Hawaii Longline Association
    Small pilot fish congregate around an oceanic whitetip shark to feed on parasites.
    © Trevor Bacon
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